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Becoming known as the sheep-a-holic vet

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Emily Gascoigne’s career began with an internship in large animal practice, but she soon found herself enjoying working with sheep and goats and creating opportunities to do so.

Categories: Journal news

Association of charity vets

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

‘Dentistry on a shoestring’, ‘keeping shelter cats happy’, ‘brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome’, ‘backyard chickens’, ‘wellbeing’, ‘research in practice’, ‘wound management’ and ‘what’s new in charity and shelter medicine’ will all be discussed at the next meeting of the Association of Charity Vets (ACV), which will be held at Glasgow University Veterinary School on the weekend of 12 and 13 January 2019.

The meeting is for vets, vet nurses and vet students, including those working in private practice who provide services to animal welfare charities or have an interest in pragmatic care.

Delegates can choose to become members of ACV for 2019 for the same price as attending as a non-member. Registration for the event can be completed at: www.associationofcharityvets.co.uk. More information is available from Bree Merritt: bmerritt@rvc.ac.uk

Categories: Journal news

Awards

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Each year VETTrust offers financial awards to support vets in undertaking CPD, especially vets living in remote areas or returning to practice following a career break. An award may, for example, take the form of supporting a place at VETTrust’s CPD conference (11 and 12 June 2019, in Stirling) or funding to support attendance at other suitable CPD events. Application forms can be downloaded from www.vettrust.co.uk and are also available from the secretary, VETTrust, Kedah, 28 St Leonard’s Road, Forres IV36 2RE, and by emailing: admin@vettrust.co.uk. Completed forms must received by 31 January 2019.

Categories: Journal news

Badgers and bTB infection

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Georgina Mills reports on new research that looks at the prevalence of bovine TB infection in road-killed badgers

Categories: Journal news

Lawrence Blair Smith

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Having been inspired to study veterinary medicine, he joined the Highlands and Islands Veterinary Services Scheme, initially caring for the animals of Orkney, before moving to the Hebrides.

Categories: Journal news

What has suddenly made fish exciting?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

There aren’t many vets who specialise in aquaculture. In the UK, out of 865 specialists currently registered with the RCVS, there are just three fish experts.

But the global aquaculture business – worth around US$232 billion annually – is set to grow phenomenally over the next decade and the number of vets choosing to work within the industry is likely to grow with it.

Aquaculture is now regarded as a bright young thing

Far from the ‘plodding’ perception that many may have of the sector, it is vibrant and primed for development and growth. Indeed, aquaculture is now regarded as a bright young thing on the investment stage – the fastest-growing and most dynamic protein-producing industry.

At a recent aquaculture conference in London (Aquaculture Innovation Europe), industry insiders talked in terms of a ‘technological and innovation explosion’ occurring across the sector.

So what is driving this market growth...

Categories: Journal news

Isoflurane shortage causes alarm in vets

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

By Josh Loeb and Adele Waters

Vets have been advised to consider postponing all routine operations until March next year due to a shortage of the veterinary anaesthetic isoflurane.

Zoetis, the manufacturer of IsoFlo, the main brand for isoflurane in the UK, issued a statement this week saying existing supplies should be reserved for emergency procedures only.

The company has been forced to halt production due to a third-party supplier being suddenly unable to supply the active pharmaceutical ingredient. As a result, isoflurane is not currently being supplied to the UK and other European markets.

The Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists (AVA) and the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) have been inundated with enquiries from vets across the UK seeking advice on alternative agents.

Vets and vet nurses need not panic. There are alternatives

Kate White, professor of veterinary anaesthesia at the University of Nottingham and senior vice president of...

Categories: Journal news

Vet falls victim to racism after speaking up

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

By Georgina Mills

A farm animal vet has been subjected to a racist letter telling him ‘Your black Get over it [sic]’.

The letter was sent to Navaratnam Partheeban in response to a ‘talking point’ piece in Farmers’ Weekly, in which he discussed how to break down the barriers to ethnic diversity in the farming profession.

The anonymous author of the offensive letter told Partheeban – a vet and senior lecturer in livestock production at the Royal Agricultural University (RAU) – to ‘Go back to your parents world [sic]’ and that ‘You may think you are British but there never has been a black english man [sic]’.

It ends: ‘If a dog is born in a stable it does not become a horse.’

The original piece in Farmers’ Weekly described Partheeban’s experience of racism. He said that while most people had treated him with warmth and respect in the...

Categories: Journal news

Licensing of rehoming centres could happen soon

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

The government is looking ‘very actively’ at licensing animal rehoming centres.

It wants to ensure they all meet the same standards, said parliamentary under secretary of state for food and animal welfare David Rutley during a debate on the topic in Westminster Hall last week.

Regulating rescue centres would improve animal welfare

The issue was raised for debate by Jim Fitzpatrick, Labour MP for Poplar and Limehouse, who highlighted the need for strengthened legislation. He said regulating rescue centres would not only improve animal welfare, but would close a legal loophole that may be allowing third-party puppy sellers to set themselves up as rescue centres.

Rutley commented that the government had already introduced new regulations requiring compulsory licences for breeders, alongside a pledge to increase the maximum penalty for animal cruelty offences.

He said that while some rescue centres were part of the Association of Dogs and Cats...

Categories: Journal news

In brief

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018
Bluetongue found in Northern Ireland

Post-import checks carried out on a heifer imported from France to Northern Ireland have revealed the animal had bluetongue.

The chief vet for Northern Ireland Robert Huey has urged farmers to remain vigilant for the disease, but says the detection of bluetongue is an example of the robust surveillance procedures that are in place in the province.

He warned farmers: ‘Anyone who imports from bluetongue-affected countries or zones, risks the possibility that if the imported animals are subsequently found to be infected with bluetongue they will be slaughtered and no compensation will be paid.’

Movement restrictions are in place at the property and the affected animal was humanely culled.

The authorities in Northern Ireland are testing associated herds and an epidemiological investigation has been initiated to assess the situation.

At this time the UK remains officially bluetongue free.

Encouraging veterinary innovation

Vets and...

Categories: Journal news

CVS slated by vets over tasteless job advert

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

By Josh Loeb

Veterinary corporate group CVS has apologised for posting a job advert for vets and vet nurses in the colours and design of the logo of its rival Vets4Pets.

The advert, which promised stability to professionals facing job cuts, was posted on social media last week (but swiftly taken down). It was widely discussed in a closed group on Facebook, where members of the profession branded it in ‘bad taste’ and ‘deeply insensitive’. They criticised CVS for ‘glorying in the misfortune of others’.

Two weeks ago it was announced by Pets at Home that up to 30 practices trading under its Vets4Pets brand may need to close over the coming months – a decision that could potentially affect hundreds of jobs (see VR, 1 December 2018, vol 183, p 635).

Pets at Home is offering to buy up to 55 practices that operate under its joint venture...

Categories: Journal news

King of the swingers: teaching orangutans how to climb

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Orangutan orphans at Four Paws’ Orangutan Forest School have a new subject on their school timetable: climbing.

The rescue centre, in East Kalimantan, Borneo, is home to eight rescued apes – four of which are orphaned youngsters, ranging from 16 months to two years old.

Climbing skills are not innate to orangutans – they are taught by their mothers – so to acclimatise them to living in the treetops, and prepare them for release into the wild, the orphans are taught to climb by human volunteers.

The volunteers are first taught how to climb themselves, with the help of professional climbers, harnesses, ropes and helmets. They then encourage the orphans to reach the tops of the trees to practise climbing and searching for food.

Categories: Journal news

Pre-slaughter stunning: whats on the horizon?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Josh Loeb discusses the latest developments in stunning methods, which have the potential to improve animal welfare

Categories: Journal news

Hepatozoon canis: another unwelcome parasitic visitor to the UK

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

A popular quote of Albert Einstein is the simple maxim ‘nothing happens until something moves’. This certainly seems to be the case for the emergence of vectorborne diseases in domestic dogs in the UK. Every year, thousands of dogs and cats are brought into the UK, providing an opportunity for unwanted pathogens and parasites to enter the country. Some dogs are returnees from short holidays with their owners, others are imported through trade, both legal and illegal, and yet more are brought in by charities after being rescued from abroad.

On the back of this we have seen a continual increase in pathogens brought into the UK, accompanied by the possibility that they could establish in the country. Examples include the importation of dogs infected with babesiosis,1,2 leishmaniosis3 and the introduction of a rabid puppy from Sri Lanka,4 this last case...

Categories: Journal news

Hepatozoon canis in three imported dogs: a new tickborne disease reaching the United Kingdom

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

An increasing number of non-endemic vectorborne pathogens have been described in dogs imported to the UK in the past two decades. Recently, an outbreak of canine babesiosis in south-east England has raised veterinary awareness with regard to the impact of such diseases on the UK canine population. Canine hepatozoonosis, caused by Hepatozoon canis and transmitted by the ingestion of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, is widespread in the Mediterranean basin. Herein we describe the first three molecularly confirmed clinical cases of canine hepatozoonosis in dogs imported into the UK. Veterinarians in the UK should be aware of H canis as a potential infection in imported dogs, especially in the face of the expanding distribution of R sanguineus ticks in Europe.

Categories: Journal news

Further description of bovine tuberculosis trends in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, 2003-2015

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Extending on earlier work, trends in bovine tuberculosis (bTB) from 2003 to 2015 are described for the countries of the UK and the Republic of Ireland using standardised definitions and measures. Based on measures of animal and herd incidence, there remains a stable situation of extremely low prevalence in Scotland and the Low Risk Area of England, and a higher but ongoing reduction in prevalence in the Republic of Ireland. In Northern Ireland, there has been a rising bTB trend during 2010–2015, although not to levels experienced during 2002–2004. In the High Risk Area and Edge Area of England during 2010–2015, the rising bTB trends have continued but with some recent evidence of stabilisation. In Wales, prevalence has fallen subsequent to a peak in 2008. The paper considers country-level differences in the light of key policy changes, which are presented in detail. This work is unique, and will assist policymakers when critically evaluating policy options for effective control and eradication. Ongoing updates of this analysis would be useful, providing an evidence base for country-level comparison of bTB trends into the future. The use of multivariable analytical methods should be considered, but will rely on substantial sharing of raw data across the five countries.

Categories: Journal news

Grit score and its relationship to successful enrolment in specialist veterinary training

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

In the UK, the majority of veterinary surgeons undertaking small animal rotating internships in university teaching hospitals do so with an intention to progress to clinical specialist training.1 However, not all those interns wanting to pursue specialist training achieve their goal. The achievement of difficult goals entails talent and a continued focused application of that talent over time.2 Veterinary degrees are highly competitive (approximately 8.3 applicants per university admission in the UK).3 Those who are successful in obtaining a degree in the UK are likely to work in small animal practice with approximately 10 per cent of recent veterinary graduates pursuing an internship.3 Selection procedures for interns applying for university-based programmes use a number of methods which include academic grades throughout their degree, examination of curricula vitae and interviews. Success is defined by interns in academic programmes as progressing to clinical specialist training.

Categories: Journal news

Selected highlights from other journals

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018
Do elimination diets contain what they say on the tin?

R. Ricci, D. Conficoni, G. Morelli and others

BMC Veterinary Research (2018) 14: 209

doi: 10.1186/s12917-018-1528-7

• What did the research find?

Out of 40 pet foods analysed, including both wet and dry novel protein diets (NPDs) and hydrolysed protein diets (HPDs), only 10 contained ingredients that correctly matched the label. Five of the products did not contain the declared animal species and the presence of undeclared animal species was detected in 23. A higher frequency of contamination was found in dry foods than wet foods, and in HPDs than NPDs. The most frequently identified contaminants were pork, chicken and turkey.

• How was it conducted?

Samples were collected from 40 food products (nine dry NPDs, 22 wet NPDs, six dry HPDs and three wet HPDs), made by 14 different producers. Each sample was analysed using DNA-based microarray to...

Categories: Journal news

BVA Brexit policy

Veterinary Record latest issue - 14 December 2018

Suggesting that BVA has ‘never expressed an opinion on Brexit’ (VR, 8 December 2018, vol 183, p 673) is misleading and flies in the face of the significant amount of work we have done at every stage to explore, scrutinise and communicate the challenges and opportunities that leaving the EU will present for the veterinary workforce, animal health and welfare, public health and future trade. It also runs counter to the views of our membership, who recently identified BVA’s policy and lobbying work around Brexit as one of our most valued and visible activities.

At every step of the way we have recognised that Brexit is something that will prompt strong and diverse opinions from both individuals and organisations, and we have taken all views into account while respecting our own democratic process. While it is correct that BVA decided against campaigning for a second referendum, this was reviewed...

Categories: Journal news
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