Journal news

Andrew connolly, marketing director at virbac, responds

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Thank you for allowing us the opportunity to respond to Alison McGettigan regarding the discontinuation of our product, Ovarid (Megestrol acetate).

We were forced to discontinue Ovarid when we were no longer able to source the product’s active ingredient

It was with great regret that we were forced to discontinue Ovarid in 2016 when we were no longer able to source the product’s active pharmaceutical ingredient, and despite our very best efforts a reliable alternative could not be found.

However, I was pleased to read of the value McGettigan placed upon Ovarid, particularly for the treatment of miliary eczema in cats, and I can only apologise that we are no longer able to supply such a valued product to our customers.

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Lara Carim, head of digital and communications at RCVS Knowledge, responds

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Many thanks to Bruce Vivash Jones for his interest in the historical feature ‘Personalities that shaped the profession’ (VR, 14 September 2019, vol 185, p 290). We agree that Sir Frederick Wellington John Fitzwygram was indeed highly influential in the development of the British veterinary profession, and of course there were many others who played important roles in steering its course.

Given the constraints of a single feature, we selected a small set of individuals who between them spanned a considerable period of change since the creation of the RCVS, and whose contribution could be illustrated by our archive collections.

We would encourage anyone wishing to find out more about the many others who helped shape the profession to explore our digital collections at www.rcvsvethistory.org or contact us at archives@rcvsknowledge.org

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Valuing vets time

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

I think that Mike Smith (VR, 10 August 2019, vol 185, p 175) misunderstood my sentiments.

Charging more for out of hours was not about being ‘money-grubbing’ but about protecting ourselves in light of the high levels of mental illness and vets leaving the profession.

Charging more is meant as a deterrent for those clients that could attend in office hours at minimal inconvenience to themselves but choose not to if there is no disincentive.

I am not sure when he left clinical practice but the pressures are entirely different from 60 years ago.

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'Livestock are not the global warming enemy

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

ffinlo Costain argues that the focus on ruminant methane in causing global warming is ill-informed and in fact restoration of grass-based systems can result in net zero emissions from UK agriculture by 2030.

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The beauty of sleep

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Sleep is a critical plank of our physical and mental wellbeing. But for those working in veterinary medicine – with its long and unpredictable hours – it is something that can be as difficult to acquire as it is precious. Claire Read speaks to Michael Farquhar, a hospital consultant in sleep medicine, about why sleep is so important and what individuals and managers can do to improve it.

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A quick energy boost

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Next time your stomach starts grumbling during a consultation and you find yourself feeling not as sharp as you might, why not reach for one of these easy-to-make snacks?

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Time to get to sleep

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Struggling to fall or to stay asleep? It’s a common problem and can be particularly challenging when working irregular and antisocial hours. Michael Farquhar offers some advice on how to increase your chances of getting the rest you need.

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Getting it right on mistakes

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Mistakes are an inevitable part of both life and veterinary practice. But Catherine Oxtoby says there are ways to reduce the risk both of an error occurring and of it impacting on your wellbeing.

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Take some time out . . .

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

In the Take Some Time Out part of the Balance section, we want to celebrate the ways our readers have found to look after themselves so they can better look after their clients.

Send your stories, photos and recommendations to vet.editorial@bmj.com or reach us on Twitter at @Vet_Record or using the hashtag #VetRecordBalance

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Jennifer Poland

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

A woman of ideas. As a teacher with an interest in learning methods, she set up the profession’s first continuing education pack, which were loaned to vets across the world.

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'Its a wonderful career, but keep your options open

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Sotirios Karvountzis is a vet with an international background. He finds achieving a work-life balance elusive, although being a helicopter pilot adds another interest as well as a relatable skill.

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People

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Bradley Hill has joined the University of Nottingham’s School of Veterinary Medicine as clinical assistant professor in equine practice, having worked in equine practice since graduating. He will deliver teaching across the curriculum to ensure that students graduate with the skills necessary to prepare them for clinical practice. In particular, he will integrate his knowledge of equine behaviour into students’s learning to ensure a greater understanding of its role in ensuring safety when working around horses, so that students are better able to identify and mitigate against the risk of injury.

The Animal Health Trust charity based in Kentford, Newmarket, is celebrating the appointment of Isabelle Vanhaezebrouck, a European specialist in radiation oncology. Heading up the European Board of Veterinary Specialisation radiation oncology department in the trust’s small animal referral centre, she brings a wealth of experience alongside her particular interests in brachytherapy radiation, stereotactic radiation and intensity modulated...

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EMS Awards

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

Bristol vet school has presented awards for outstanding engagement on EMS placements. Prizes in the form academic book vouchers, provided by Zoetis, were presented at the university’s graduation ceremony in August.

Jamie Rahman received the award as the most engaged vet student on EMS placement: ‘He showed great engagement with the EMS process and his feedback on his placements was thoughtful and considered, with constructive and detailed reflections on each. He used his EMS to improve his clinical skills and knowledge, and to help reaffirm his passion for charity work.’

Dana Flint won the award for the most engaged vet nursing student on EMS placement: ‘She showed great engagement with the process of finding and booking suitable placements. She had good communication skills with the EMS office throughout. Her feedback revealed that she was an exceptional student who showed outstanding professional behaviour.’

...
Categories: Journal news

RCVS accreditation for grenada's vet school

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

St George’s University’s (SGU) School of Veterinary Medicine’s degree has received full RCVS accreditation to 2024. This means that its vet graduates, who have also completed the global veterinary health track, will be eligible to register as members of the RCVS to practice in the UK. The school is one of only a few schools to be accredited by both the American Veterinary Medical Association in the USA and Canada, as well as the RCVS. The decision followed two visits by the RCVS to the campus in Grenada in 2017 and 2019, which determined that the vet school was well managed, run sustainably, properly resourced, and provided an up-to-date professional curriculum and appropriate student support.

Categories: Journal news

New name, wider remit, same importance

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

News that the Farm Animal Welfare Committee has been renamed the Animal Welfare Committee (see VR, 5 October 2019, vol 185, p 389) marks the end of an era. It does not, however, mark the end of the importance of the advice and expertise the committee provides to government.

Constituted originally as the Farm Animal Welfare Council in July 1979, the council was key in refining the concept of the Five Freedoms for farmed animals. It published many reports and opinions considering matters such as dairy cow welfare, lameness in sheep, environmental enrichment and mutilations in pigs, the importance of diligent stockmanship for good welfare, welfare labelling on foods of animal origin, and tail docking and castration of lambs.

It also supported the principle that all farmed animals should have ‘a life worth living’, and that increasing numbers of farmed animals should have ‘a good life’.

The council’s role...

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Is the badger cull actually spreading bTB?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

By Georgina Mills

Badger culling could be responsible for spreading bovine TB (bTB) more widely due to surviving badger populations travelling further afield during and following a culling episode.

According to new research carried out by the Zoological Society of London’s Institute of Zoology and Imperial’s MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, badgers cover more ground after a cull than they would do ordinarily – some 61 per cent more land each month.

During a cull, they also visit 45 per cent more fields each month, and the odds of a badger visiting neighbouring territories each night increases 20-fold.

The results appear to show that as individuals are removed from neighbouring groups and territories open up during a cull, surviving badgers tend to explore new areas.

The changes in their travel habits are evident from the onset of culling, meaning badgers could spread the infection to others or...

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RCVS signs recognition agreement with Ireland

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

The RCVS has for the first time secured a bilateral mutual recognition agreement with another EU member state.

This is a vital element of future proofing

The move comes ahead of 31 October – the date on which Brexit is due to take place – and was described by RCVS president Niall Connell as ‘a vital element of future proofing’.

Under the deal, the college will recognise graduates of Dublin’s School of Veterinary Medicine as vets whatever the outcome of Brexit. In return, the college’s Irish equivalent, the Veterinary Council of Ireland (VCI), will do the same for UK-qualified vets.

The agreement means that UK vets will be able to continue to register as vets in the Republic of Ireland, and vice versa.

Under the EU’s directive on mutual recognition of professional qualifications, veterinary regulators in EU member states must automatically register any graduates of vet schools in...

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Surrey vet school gains RCVS accreditation

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

The University of Surrey has won accreditation from the RCVS for its veterinary medicine degree course.

The decision by RCVS council last week to accredit Surrey means that, pending final approval from the Privy Council (in reality something of a formality), it is the UK’s eighth vet school.

The first cohort of graduates from Surrey have already registered with the RCVS in anticipation of this becoming official.

Surrey vet school head Chris Proudman said he was delighted by the decision, which he said ‘vindicated’ Surrey’s model of delivering clinical teaching ‘through working in partnership with clinical practices and other organisations involved in animal health.’

Speaking to Vet Record after last week’s council meeting, which he attended, Proudman described the decision as a ‘verdict on the quality of our degree programme.’

Securing RCVS accreditation was the fruit of around eight years’ hard work, he added.

Surrey welcomed its first cohort...

Categories: Journal news

Corneal graft from a pig saves dogs sight

Veterinary Record latest issue - 11 October 2019

A Chihuahua called Pepe has had his vision restored with the help of a novel corneal xenograft procedure.

Carried out at Davies Veterinary Specialists, vets used a graft from a pig cornea to repair Pepe’s vision, which was deteriorating due to a shallow corneal ulcer that was extending rapidly to the Descemet’s membrane.

An allograft (a graft from another dog) is preferred but, as the team needed to work urgently, they decided to use an available xenograft, derived from pig cornea. The process of creating this graft was developed in China.

Pepe made a full recovery and now, four months after the operation, his eye is fully functional, visual and minimally scarred.

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