Journal news

Awards

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

SRUC Veterinary Services has awarded Redwings Horse Sanctuary silver status within its Premium Assured Strangles Scheme, a national scheme that aims to control strangles in horses. The charity’s Stamp Out Strangles Campaign encourages yard managers and horse owners to screen new horses coming onto a yard so that strangles carriers can be identified and treated.

Dog Gone Fishin’ air dried or baked fish dog treats that are made in Cornwall, have won the Glee trade show’s new product showcase award in the Best Pet Food and Treats category. Glee is a garden and outdoor living trade show.

Categories: Journal news

Mapping ticks to prevent Lyme disease

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

An integrated project involving satellites, emerging technology and big data that aims to prevent the occurrence of Lyme disease has been launched in the Highlands of Scotland.

LymeApp will combine satellite information with data from the Scottish Lyme Disease and Tick-borne Infections Reference Laboratory in Inverness with information from general medical practitioners and those exposed to ticks through work or recreation. Using citizen science technology, LymeApp will also allow the public to report tick sightings and bites to this central database. From the information provided, detailed maps will be produced, showing where ticks are likely to be and where the disease is reported most often.

The information will be made available through a website and linked app, which is being developed by International Disease Mapping Apps (a new company formed by Scotland’s Rural College), Highland Health Ventures (a collaborative partner for NHS Highland), the Environmental Research Group and Belgium-based...

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Products

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

Virbac has launched a prescription-only, four-in-one trace mineral injection to combat oxidative stress and its effects in cattle. Multimin contains zinc, copper, manganese and selenium; it is designed to be administered during, or in advance of, periods of high demand in dairy and beef cattle, such as breeding, calving, weaning and vaccination.

NSAID Finadyne, with active ingredient flunixin meglumine, has been approved for use in the UK following reformulation by MSD Animal Health to allow its use in food-producing animals. Finadyne 50 mg/ml solution for injection is indicated for the alleviation of acute inflammation and pain in cattle and pigs, as well as the alleviation of inflammation and pain associated with musculoskeletal disorders and colic in horses. With a shelf life of three years, it is available from wholesalers in 50 ml and 100 ml vials.

Dechra Veterinary Products has expanded its equine range with the addition of Nerfasin...

Categories: Journal news

Website resource supports vaccine development

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

Scientists from the Pirbright Institute and the Roslin Institute have launched ‘The Immunological Toolbox’ – www.immunologicaltoolbox.co.uk – a website that provides a platform where veterinary researchers can find resources and collaborate. Its aim is to remove barriers to veterinary vaccine development by providing a central database of reagents and supporting information exchange.

Researchers are able to freely search the location, supply and application of the most comprehensive repository of antibodies and modified proteins available from commercial companies and academic institutes. They can also provide feedback about the use of each reagent, leave ratings and comments, submit supporting data, references, images and any other evidence that enables the community to better understand the reagent.

Categories: Journal news

West Nile fever in Europe in 2018: an emerging problem or just an anomaly?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

Last summer saw an unusually high number of cases of West Nile fever in horses and people in south and south-east Europe, but it is too early to tell if this was a one-off increase or a sign of things to come. Here, Christopher Browne, Eleanor Glendenning, Jolyon Medlock and Helen Roberts discuss the various West Nile fever surveillance and control mechanisms in place in the UK.

Categories: Journal news

Gaining insights into factors associated with rehoming of horses from equine charities

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

The British equestrian sector is experiencing growth – 27 million people have an interest in equestrianism, participation in riding is increasing and the economic contribution of the industry has grown to £4.7 billion.1 The current equine population of Great Britain is estimated to be 847,000 horses, donkeys and mules, with the majority of these being privately owned and kept for sport and leisure riding purposes.1,2

Despite the growth in popularity of equestrianism, Great Britain has arguably been in the maelstrom of an ongoing equine welfare crisis since the start of the current decade.3,4 No statutory equine database exists, there is no regulation of breeding or ownership and the current poor economic climate continues to increase the costs of horse ownership. Alongside this, the equine industry acknowledges there is an obesity crisis among recreational horses,5 and a recent...

Categories: Journal news

Factors associated with rehoming and time until rehoming for horses listed with an equine charity

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

The number of unwanted horses in the UK has increased in recent years. It is therefore important to identify factors that indicate whether a horse can be rehomed and how long it takes to be rehomed. Data from 1 January 2013 until 30 March 2014 were extracted from an equine rehoming charity’s database. Exposure variables were examined using multivariable logistic and Cox regression. In total, 791 horses were included in the study and 410 (51.8%) were rehomed during the study period. Median time until rehomed was 39 days (IQR 24–75). Horses whose owner was prepared to transfer ownership were nearly three times more likely to be rehomed than those available for loan. Horses deemed suitable for beginner riders had higher odds of finding a new home, compared with those needing an advanced rider. Horses that were only suitable as unridden companions took longer to find a new home than rideable horses. A restricted rehoming radius (<50 miles) also resulted in longer time to rehoming. Findings from this study can be used to inform rehoming strategies but also to identify horses less likely to be rehomed, and thus where alternative options should be considered.

Categories: Journal news

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis seroconversion in dairy cattle and its association with raised somatic cell count

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

This retrospective case–control study investigates the relationship between seroconversion to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and raised somatic cell count (SCC). The study consists of 112 case cows from three dairy farms in the UK; for each case cow with a positive antibody titre, there was a seronegative control cow for comparison. Seroconversion was monitored using milk ELISA antibody titres for MAP taken at quarterly intervals. SCCs were recorded at the time a positive antibody titre was first recorded as well as at the previous and subsequent milk recording in order to explore a temporal relationship between the two events. The previous and subsequent milk recordings were a month before and after seroconversion was identified. The results showed that cows that were infected with MAP had an increased SCC around the time that they first became seropositive, providing evidence for a temporal relationship between the two events; high SCCs were particularly prevalent before and at the time of first detecting seroconversion. The explanation is being discussed that potentially an underlying, currently not studied, factor may be predisposing both events, the progression of paratuberculosis is predisposing the host to mastitis, or indeed intramammary infections help initiate paratuberculosis progression.

Categories: Journal news

Spongiform leucoencephalomyelopathy in border terriers: clinical, electrophysiological and imaging features

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

A novel spongiform leucoencephalomyelopathy was reported in border terrier puppies in 2012 causing a shaking puppy phenotype, but no information regarding clinical progression, imaging or electrophysiological findings were available. The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical, electrophysiological and MRI features of this disease in seven dogs and compare them with human white matter disorders. All cases presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe generalised coarse body tremors, which started at three weeks of age. The three cases that were not euthanased showed slow but progressive improvement over several months. Brainstem auditory evoked response demonstrated a normal wave I, reduced amplitude of wave II and an absence of waves III–VII. MRI revealed bilateral and symmetrical T2-weighted hyperintensities affecting the brainstem and cerebellar white matter. Histological examination of the brain and spinal cord showed spongiform change affecting the white matter of the cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord with decreased myelin content. In summary, this leucoencephalomyelopathy has a pathognomonic clinical presentation with defining MRI and electrophysiological characteristics, and it is the first report to describe a long-term improvement of this condition.

Categories: Journal news

In cats with cardiogenic thromboembolism, is treating with aspirin associated with a better outcome?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

Bottom line

  • Based upon current evidence, aspirin appears to be well tolerated, particularly at lower doses. However, there is no evidence that aspirin is effective in preventing recurrent cardiogenic thromboembolism or cardiac-associated death in cats with cardiac disease.

  • Aspirin appears to be inferior to clopidogrel for the prevention of subsequent thromboembolic events and in promoting survival in cats with a history of arterial thromboembolism.

  • Clinical scenario

    You are presented with a mature feline patient with a peracute onset of tachypnoea and non-ambulatory paraparesis. The cat is hypothermic, with a sternal systolic murmur and cold, stiff hindlimbs with pale cyanotic nail beds and poorly palpable hindlimb pulses. You provide oxygen therapy, diuretics and analgesia and perform a cardiac ultrasound, which identifies ventricular myocardial thickening and left atrial enlargement consistent with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). You diagnose the cat with a cardiogenic feline arterial thromboembolism (FATE).

    Your clients...

    Categories: Journal news

    Selected highlights from other journals

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019
    Identifying early indicators of enteric disease in dairy calves

    G. L. Lowe, M. A. Sutherland, J. R. Waas and others

    Journal of Dairy Science (2019) 102, 5389–402

    doi: 10.3168/jds.2018-15701

    • What did the research find?

    Calves’ milk consumption decreased before clinical signs of neonatal calf diarrhoea (NCD) appeared. A decrease in shoulder temperature and an increase in side temperature were also observed. There were no changes in respiration rate or lying time. However, the number of lying bouts decreased and lying bout duration increased before and following clinical signs of disease. There was no change in the number of visits to the water trough before NCD became apparent, but duration increased.

    • How was it conducted?

    In total, 43 calves were either experimentally infected with rotavirus (n=20) or remained uninfected (n=23). Health checks were conducted on a daily basis to identify when calves presented overt clinical signs of disease....

    Categories: Journal news

    Treatment failure of lungworm in cattle

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    We are now into the higher risk period of lungworm disease in cattle

    As we are now into the higher risk period of lungworm disease in cattle, we are writing to make colleagues aware of the diagnostic options, importance of correct treatment and the investigation of possible inefficacious treatments.

    Parasitic bronchitis, due to Dictyocaulus viviparus, can occur in grazing cattle of all ages. Clinical disease is characterised by coughing that may be accompanied by increased respiratory rate and effort, respiratory distress, milk drop and reduced weight gain/weight loss. Clinical signs are seen two to four weeks after the ingestion of infective larvae by non-immune cattle.

    Diagnostic testing for lungworm in live cattle is by Baermann examination of faeces or serum antibody ELISA; detection of a raised eosinophil count may provide supportive evidence. More information regarding cattle lungworm, including confirmationary tests, can be found in an article by McLeonard...

    Categories: Journal news

    The UKs contribution to eliminating rabies

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    The UK is considered to be free from terrestrial rabies, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health’s (OIE’s) definition. The last locally acquired human case of terrestrial rabies was in 1922 and since then, a combination of strict import rules and quarantine has kept us disease free. Harmonisation with the EU pet travel rules in 2012 has not changed this situation, as the disease status of many countries in Europe has substantially improved in the past 30 years since pet and wildlife vaccination programmes were put in place in 1988. This is despite the large increase in travelling pets since harmonising with the simplified EU rules for pet travel.

    Nevertheless, like many countries around Europe, we continue to report cases of the related European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV) in our native bat population. In 2002, a man, who was unvaccinated but worked with bats, died from EBLV after being...

    Categories: Journal news

    Dogs needed for epilepsy study

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    Epilepsy is the most common canine chronic neurological brain disease encountered in first-opinion practice. Diet is increasingly recognised as having an impact upon the seizure activity and behaviour in dogs with epilepsy.

    Our LifeTIME study at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) is looking at the long-term influence of a medium-chain fatty acid diet in the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. This is a randomised, double-blinded, prospective dietary trial comparing a standard diet to a medium-chain triglyceride-supplemented diet in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    We are currently recruiting dogs for this study. We are looking for dogs that: have been diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy; are between the ages of six months and 12 years; have had at least two generalised seizures in the past six months; do not have a history of cluster seizures (two or more seizures in one day) or status epilepticus; do not have a history of renal/hepatic/cardiac...

    Categories: Journal news

    The changing face of veterinary practice

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    This month, David Steer discusses the impact of practice expansion on long-standing clients

    Categories: Journal news

    Timothy David Hirst

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    A ‘friend to all’, as well as an inspirational vet who was fully committed to the future of British farming

    Categories: Journal news

    Marine mammal vets dedication marked by prestigious award

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    Vet pathologist James Barnett has been awarded the ZSL Silver Medal for his outstanding work in the field of wildlife conservation involving marine mammals. Jan Loveridge explains why the award is so well deserved.

    Categories: Journal news

    Final-year student diary

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    Vet Record Careers’ vet student diarist Rosie Perrett has qualified as a vet and looks forward to working in practice.

    Categories: Journal news

    Unlocking the research potential

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    Last week was a good week for highlighting the knowledge and expertise that is evident in the veterinary profession.

    The BVA held its annual members’ day, which includes the presentation of its awards. The awards celebrate those who have made an outstanding contribution to veterinary science and the profession (see pp 358–359), but BVA also provides funds to assist today’s students to further their studies.

    Members’ day is also when we present the Vet Record Impact Award. Each year, this award recognises the research paper, published within the previous year, that we consider has the most potential to change practice.

    This year, there was a clear winner – a paper by Andrea Turner, David Tisdall and colleagues,1 which found that reducing antimicrobial use generally, and ceasing the use of the highest priority critically important antimicrobials, had no detrimental effect on the health, welfare and production parameters of...

    Categories: Journal news

    No deal must come off the table, says BVA

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 27 September 2019

    By Adele Waters

    The BVA is firmly against the prospect of the UK crashing out of the EU without a deal.

    Last week its council backed a call for a no-deal Brexit to be taken off the table in the current Brexit negotiations.

    The position was taken by council members – who backed the move by a vote of 15 to four, in favour.

    The decision followed a recommendation by the officer team and their detailed analysis of the likely impact of no deal on a range of issues, from veterinary workforce, animal welfare standards, medicines and the impact of new tariffs on trade, as well as its knock-on effect on farm and vet businesses.

    Gudrun Ravetz, BVA past president, urged fellow council members to support the move, saying: ‘We have never shied away from things that affect animal health and welfare.’

    ‘This is not a vote on whether...

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