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Developing a resilient approach

17 January 2019

Resilience can be defined as our ability to move forward while coping with the pressures placed upon us. Although veterinary practice can be a pressurised environment, this does not mean that it should result in stress; pressure and stress are two very different things. We all know that we need some pressure to help motivate and focus us. Stress is a natural response to pressure that exceeds our mental or physical resources.

While practice owners and managers have obligations to address factors within the working environment which may increase the risk of stress, individuals can take actions to develop their own resilience.

Establish the baseline

What are the threats to your resilience? What turns a good day into a bad day for you? It’s important to recognise the factors that cause you to feel unable to cope so that you can take action to minimise or eliminate these.

Spend...

Categories: Journal news

Gordon Nicholson Henderson

17 January 2019

A dynamic entrepreneur who had a pivotal role in developing veterinary associations and societies, and demonstrated boundless enthusiasm in encouraging the profession to engage with the public.

Categories: Journal news

Taking an independent path

17 January 2019

Farm vet Jenny Hull never thought she would be setting up her own practice, but in January 2018 she opened Black Sheep Farm Health, to serve beef and sheep farmers in Northumberland.

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Congresses

17 January 2019

The College of Animal Welfare (CAW) has announced that its Head Nurse Congress, for head nurses and practice managers, will be held on 11 to 12 May at the East of England Arena and Events Centre in Peterborough. The congress aims to inspire those who lead teams to bring about positive changes in their own practices. It will include lectures on effective communication, recruitment, managing meetings, leadership and coaching skills, and apprenticeship standards, among others. Tracey Croucher, short course and events manager at CAW, said: ‘We’re delighted to be bringing the head nurse congress back for another year, and are equally as excited about the amazing speakers who will each bring their perspective to the issues facing veterinary practices today.’ An early-bird rate is available until 31 March; details from www.caw.ac.uk

The British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA) will provide a crèche for children aged 0 to...

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Standing up to racism

17 January 2019

This week in Vet Record we are publishing a feature article on the racism suffered by those in the profession who are black, Asian or from a minority ethnic group (BAME).

The three case studies featured show that, not only are there some shocking incidents that have been experienced, but also that the problem appears to be far from a rare occurrence.

And that they have experienced racism not only from clients but from fellow vet students and colleagues, especially those in more senior roles, is depressing and shameful to read.

Actual data on racism incidents experienced by vets, vet nurses and vet students is lacking, so it is to be welcomed that the RCVS plans to gather data to ascertain the extent of the problem.

It is an issue on which there should be zero tolerance and racism should be called out on every occasion

But as...

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Preparations for no-deal Brexit ramped up

17 January 2019

By Josh Loeb

The scale of defeat for Theresa May’s Brexit deal suggests a no-deal Brexit is an increased likelihood, BVA president Simon Doherty said this week.

MPs voted 432 against and 202 for the deal, which would have established a transition period of at least 21 months during which negotiations on setting up a UK-EU trade agreement would take place.

Under Article 50 the UK is legally compelled to leave the EU on 29 March 2019 – regardless of whether a deal is approved. Therefore, unless parliament can agree an alternative, or unless the government cancels or extends Article 50, the UK is set for an automatic no-deal departure.

This week’s defeat, the largest in the history of the House of Commons, led veterinary organisations to declare that they are redoubling efforts to prepare for a no-deal Brexit.

A no-deal Brexit will have a profound impact on the...

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News section PDF

17 January 2019
Categories: Journal news

2018 is record year for RCVS disciplinaries

17 January 2019

By Josh Loeb

The disciplinary committees of the RCVS directed that nine vets and two vet nurses should be struck off in 2018 – the highest number in recent years.

On average just two members of the veterinary professions (vet and vet nurse) were struck off by the regulator in each of the previous three years.

In 2018 the RCVS disciplinary committees were far busier than usual. In total, 25 disciplinary hearings were held during the year – 23 for vets and 2 for nurses. This compares with an average of 10 to 12 hearings held annually across all years for which figures are available.

Of the 25 hearings that took place in 2018, 11 resulted in a vet or vet nurse receiving the most severe sanction – the removal of their name from the UK register of vets or vet nurses.

The increase appears to have been driven...

Categories: Journal news

UK isoflurane supply set to be restocked

17 January 2019

By Josh Loeb

Restocking of the UK’s veterinary isoflurane supply chain is set to begin next month, animal health company Zoetis has informed vets.

Last week Zoetis published an update for its customers on the supply of IsoFlo, its brand of isoflurane which accounts for two thirds of this anaesthetic used in the UK.

It may take several months for Zoetis to meet the full demand for the product

‘Starting from February we will be managing a series of deliveries of IsoFlo back into the UK supply chain until we are able to meet the full demand. This may take several months to complete,’ the company told customers.

The amount of the volatile anaesthetic available in the UK may not return to pre-shortage levels until as late as May this year, Vet Record understands.

When news of problems with the manufacture of isoflurane broke last month, Zoetis advised...

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Zoetis to review its growth-promoting antibiotics in India

17 January 2019

Zoetis has removed claims on its Indian website that its antibiotics can be used to help animals grow faster – although it is still selling the products for this purpose.

Last year Vet Record published an investigation conducted by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) revealing how Zoetis was selling antibiotic feed supplements in India to make animals grow quicker, while at the same time publicly supporting a ban on such a practice in the USA, leading experts to accuse Zoetis of ‘double standards’ (VR, 13 October 2018, vol 183, pp 432-433, pictured).

There is international consensus that the use of antibiotics for growth promotion should be prohibited in an attempt to stem the rising threat of antimicrobial resistance.

The practice is already banned in the USA and EU, but is still permitted in India – although that may be about to change.

Responding to the BIJ’s story last...

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Multi-million pound boost for greyhound welfare

17 January 2019

By Georgina Mills

The government has agreed a £3 million deal with some of Britain’s biggest bookmakers to improve the care of racing greyhounds.

The deal, which was announced by sport minister Mims Davies last week, will provide money for new greyhound-specific training for veterinary staff, the expansion of an injury recovery scheme to ensure more greyhounds can enjoy a full and active life following racing, and increased funding for the Greyhound Trust to provide more homes for dogs as they enter retirement.

The money will also go towards improving safety and welfare across the UK’s 21 licensed racetracks, with measures such as kennel improvements and the provision of air-conditioning for trainers’ vehicles.

The voluntary commitment from Betfred, William Hill, Sky Betting and Gaming, and Paddy Power Betfair, was reached following discussions chaired by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport, which called for a fair return to...

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Scotland commits to compulsory CCTV in abattoirs

17 January 2019

Legislation will be introduced this year requiring abattoirs in Scotland to have CCTV in all areas where live animals are present, the Scottish government has announced.

The move is intended to ensure the highest standards of animal welfare in abattoirs, by helping those responsible for enforcing welfare legislation, and was backed by the vast majority of respondents to a consultation carried out by the Scottish government last year.

Announcing the news, minister for rural affairs and the natural environment Mairi Gougeon said: ‘More than eight out of 10 slaughterhouses in Scotland have already installed CCTV coverage in their premises voluntarily, and over 95 per cent of all animals slaughtered in Scotland are covered by some form of CCTV. However, the standards of that coverage can differ.

‘This government is committed to ensuring the highest standards of welfare for all animals.’

BVA Scottish Branch president Melissa Donald said: ‘This is...

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Natural born killers? Tackling feline hunting to save wildlife

17 January 2019

Josh Loeb discusses recent research that examined owners’ perceptions about their cats’ roaming behaviour

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In brief

17 January 2019
Over 400 VNs removed from register

The RCVS removed 450 vet nurses (VNs) from the register this year for non-payment of their annual renewal fee.

The fee for VNs is due for payment on 1 November every year, although they have up to midnight on 31 December to pay before they are removed from the register.

Of the 450 VNs who were removed for non-payment this year, 150 subsequently applied for restoration to the register. The number of removals represents 2.7 per cent of the whole VN profession and is 0.8 per cent higher than last year.

Brachy breeds top illegal puppy imports

French bulldogs and pugs top the list of dog breeds vets most commonly suspect of being imported illegally into the UK, statistics released by the BVA have revealed.

The association’s voice of the veterinary profession survey found that 29 per cent of small animal vets...

Categories: Journal news

'Its time to call out racism in the profession

17 January 2019

Only 3 per cent of the veterinary profession identify themselves as coming from an ethnic minority background. Here, Matthew Limb speaks to some individuals who have decided it is time to speak out on racism and question the leading bodies on the action they plan to take to tackle it.

Categories: Journal news

Treatment failures lead to multiple deaths from ostertagiosis in dairy youngstock

17 January 2019

SRUC VS disease Surveillance headlines, September 2018

  • Losses due to type 1 ostertagiosis in dairy youngstock at grass.

  • Outbreaks of autumn nematodirosis in lambs.

  • Deaths due to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis septicaemia in turkey poults.

  • The mean temperature in Scotland in September 2018 was 0.4°C below the 1981 to 2010 average. It was a wet month in the north west, with many places having over 150 per cent of average rainfall, but was much drier in Aberdeenshire. Overall, rainfall was 128 per cent of average and sunshine was 99 per cent of average.

    CattleNutritional and metabolic disorders

    A group of 40 cows with calves at foot was gathered in order for the cows to be scanned. All the animals appeared healthy when returned to the field but a well grown five-month-old Simmental cross calf was found dead the next morning.

    The carcase was submitted to Dumfries...

    Categories: Journal news

    Cerebrocortical necrosis in ruminants

    17 January 2019

    Francesca Martelli, Sue Kidd and Joanna Lawes of the APHA discuss surveillance findings relating to Salmonella isolates from horses, and also the antimicrobial resistance patterns being seen

    Categories: Journal news

    Equine piroplasmosis - the view of a practitioner from an endemic region

    17 January 2019

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is the most prevalent tickborne disease in equids in certain areas of the world and not only causes important economic losses but also leads to movement restrictions.1 EP is endemic in mainland Europe and tropical/subtropical regions of Asia, South and Central America and Africa, and the increasing movement of horses between countries contributes to the spread of the disease from endemic to non-endemic areas.2-4 To prevent the introduction of carrier animals to non-endemic countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia and Japan, only seronegative horses are allowed to be imported. Moreover, the full extent of the economic losses that can be attributed to the consequences of chronic EP infection in endemic countries is unknown. For these reasons, control of EP in endemic countries is critical for the equine industry.

    The disease is caused by two haemoprotozoan parasites of the phylum...

    Categories: Journal news

    Equine piroplasmosis status in the UK: an assessment of laboratory diagnostic submissions and techniques

    17 January 2019

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) has historically been of minor concern to UK equine practitioners, primarily due to a lack of competent tick vectors. However, increased detection of EP tick vector species in the UK has been reported recently. EP screening is not currently required for equine importation, and when combined with recent relaxations in movement regulations, there is an increased risk regarding disease incursion and establishment into the UK. This study evaluated the prevalence of EP by both serology and PCR among 1242 UK equine samples submitted for EP screening between February and December 2016 to the Animal and Plant Health Agency and the Animal Health Trust. Where information was available, 81.5 per cent of submissions were for the purpose of UK export testing, and less than 0.1 per cent for UK importation. Serological prevalence of EP was 8.0 per cent, and parasite DNA was found in 0.8 per cent of samples. A subsequent analysis of PCR sensitivity in archived clinical samples indicated that the proportion of PCR-positive animals is likely to be considerably higher. The authors conclude that the current threat imposed by UK carrier horses is not adequately monitored and further measures are required to improve national biosecurity and prevent endemic disease.

    Categories: Journal news

    Home monitoring of heart rate and heart rhythm with a smartphone-based ECG in dogs

    17 January 2019

    The feasibility of the home monitoring of heart rate (HR) and rhythm through ECG tracings recorded by owners with a smartphone ECG device was evaluated in dogs. Smartphone ECG tracings were recorded by owners at home using a single-lead ECG device and sent via email for interpretation. A questionnaire was prepared to assess the owner’s opinion regarding this home monitoring service. Recordings were evaluated by two operators, and agreement was evaluated for HR and rhythm diagnosis. Thirty-three dogs were included. Thirty-one owners (94 per cent) felt that the recording technique was easy to learn and that the smartphone ECG device was easy to use. A total of 15 owners (45 per cent) required a second person to hold the dog during recording. Of the 150 smartphone ECG tracings that were received, 134 (89 per cent) were interpretable. The median difference between the two operators to assess the mean HR on the smartphone tracings was 10 bpm (–10, +25 bpm). Perfect agreement (=1) between operators was observed in the heart rhythm evaluation. Most owners sent adequate ECG tracings for interpretation via email from their smartphone. Home monitoring of HR and heart rhythm may represent an additional tool in the management of dogs with arrhythmias.

    Categories: Journal news