Feed aggregator

Medicines update

Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

The points below highlight changes in marketing authorisations (MAs) that may have a significant impact on veterinary surgeons’ prescribing decisions.

New marketing authorisations

New marketing authorisations relevant to veterinary surgeons in the UK that were issued or published in November 2019 are listed in Table 1.

Of those products listed, the VMD draws attention to:

  • • Calmino Vet, 380/60/50 mg/ml solution for infusion for cattle, sheep and pigs. This is the first product indicated for treatment of acute hypocalcaemia complicated by deficiency of magnesium in pigs. The product is also indicated in cattle and sheep for this purpose. The product contains the active substances calcium gluconate, magnesium chloride hexahydrate and boric acid.

  • • Equipred 50 mg tablets for horses. These are the first tablets containing the active substance prednisolone approved for use in horses. The product is indicated for alleviation of inflammatory and clinical parameters...

  • Categories: Journal news

    Hepatogenous photosensitisation leading to death in lambs

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    SRUC VS disease surveillance headlines, October 2019

  • Idiopathic bovine neonatal pancytopenia in a dairy calf.

  • Severe photosensitisation of unknown aetiology in weaned lambs.

  • Corvid respiratory syndrome in crows (Corvus corone).

  • Focus on a congenital condition in neonatal calves manifesting as asymmetrical mandibular malformation and reduced ability to suck

  • The weather in October 2019 in Scotland was generally unsettled with a mean temperature 0.8°C below the 1981 to 2010 average. Rainfall was 87 per cent of average and sunshine was 118 per cent of average.

    CattleParasitic diseases

    One animal from a group of 13 yearling dairy heifers died one week after returning home from rented grazing where the group had been stocked since May. A moxidectin pour-on had been applied in early August but coughing was noted later that month. Coughing was still apparent in October and weight loss was also reported.

    Postmortem examination...

    Categories: Journal news

    Asymmetrical mandibular malformation and failure to suck in neonatal calves

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    A congenital condition of cattle in the UK that hinders effective sucking in neonatal calves has been recognised for some years. With anecdotal reports from practitioners suggesting it is being seen more often, this focus article aims to raise awareness of the condition.

    Categories: Journal news

    Best practice for the design and statistical analysis of animal studies

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Recent developments in technology and computing are facilitating the collection and processing of large volumes of increasingly complex data, while apparently supporting easier access to advanced data analysis methodologies and cutting-edge algorithms that, superficially at least, are straightforward to use.

    While it is true that the technical aspect of statistical computation is dramatically simplified by access to software tools, the most important requirements for success are a genuine understanding of variation and uncertainty coupled with well-developed statistical knowledge and thinking. However, with the proliferation of systems for rapid, semi-unsupervised data processing and analysis, particularly in relation to new forms of complex high-throughput data, users are increasingly less likely to be aware of, understand or know how to assess the assumptions that new algorithms and advanced statistical methods are making, especially where these assessments are subjective and require use of other concepts and methods.

    Statistics as a discipline may be...

    Categories: Journal news

    The term 'Pilot Study is misused in veterinary medicine: a critical assessment

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Authors commonly use the term ‘Pilot Study’ in the veterinary literature. The term has a specific definition in medical literature, but is not defined in veterinary literature. Therefore, we sought to examine the frequency of the use of the term and the characteristics of studies using the term in the article title, and derive the intended meaning of the term. We identified all articles in veterinary literature using the term in the article title between 2008 and 2017. We then examined specific characteristics of articles published between 2008 and 2012. We found use of the term is increasing (P<0.0001). Of articles using the term between 2008 and 2012, only 20 per cent led to a larger, more comprehensive verifying study. Most garnered few citations, but 75 per cent were cited in review articles. Pilot studies had a median sample size of 10 subjects. We found comparable studies for each pilot study that did not incorporate the term into their titles. None of the authors of any of the pilot studies defined the term or explained why their study was termed a ‘pilot study’. Journals and authors used the term haphazardly. Our findings indicate that the term ‘Pilot Study’ is meaningless because it meets no specific, consistently adhered-to criteria. We believe that authors use the term as a means of ‘Deficiency signaling’ to editors, reviewers and readers. We recommend that authors and journals abandon the term in veterinary literature because it serves no purpose, is not used consistently and might harm veterinary medicine.

    Categories: Journal news

    Effects of soft tissue artefacts on computed segmental and stifle kinematics in canine motion analysis

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Skin marker-based motion analysis has been widely used to evaluate the functional performance of canine gait and posture. However, the interference of soft tissues between markers and the underlying bones (soft tissue artefacts, STAs) may lead to errors in kinematics measurements. Currently, no optimal marker attachment sites and cluster compositions are recommended for canine gait analysis. The current study aims to evaluate cluster-level STAs and the effects of cluster compositions on the computed stifle kinematics. Ten mixed-breed healthy dogs affixed with 19 retroreflective markers on the thigh and shank were enrolled. During isolated stifle passive extension, the marker trajectories were acquired with a motion capture system, and the skeletal poses were determined by integrating fluoroscopic and CT images of the bones. The cluster-level STAs were assessed, and clusters were paired to calculate the stifle kinematics. A selection of cluster compositions was useful for deriving accurate sagittal and frontal plane stifle kinematics with flexion angles below 50 per cent of the range of motion. The findings contribute to improved knowledge of canine STAs and their influence on motion measurements. The marker composition with the smallest error in describing joint kinematics is recommended for future applications and study in dogs during dynamic gait assessment.

    Categories: Journal news

    Survival of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes on hoof knife blades and the effects of various disinfectants

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020
    Background

    Bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) is a painful infectious foot disease of cattle, and much evidence implicates a pathogenic role for treponemes. This study measured the survival of BDD treponemes on hoof knife blades and tested the efficacy of relevant disinfectants under laboratory conditions.

    Methods

    Two strains of BDD treponemes were applied to hoof knife blades under aerobic conditions. Swabs were taken at different time points (10 minutes, one hour, two hours, four hours and 18 hours) and again after 20-second disinfection time with one of five disinfectants. Swabs were used directly for nested PCR to detect treponemes or inoculated for anaerobic growth, and subsequently examined using phase contrast microscopy and PCR.

    Results

    BDD treponeme DNA was detectable by nested PCR at all survival time points, and these organisms were culturable from hoof knives for two hours after exposure under aerobic conditions in the laboratory. Three of the five disinfectants—1 per cent volume per volume (v/v) FAM30®, 2 per cent weight per volume (w/v) Virkon® or 2 per cent (v/v) sodium hypochlorite—were effective at preventing visible growth of treponemes following 20-seconds contact, and 1 per cent (v/v) FAM30® also prevented detection of treponemes by PCR.

    Conclusion

    Treponeme viability of two hours under aerobic conditions suggests BDD treponemes could be transmitted between cows on hoof knives. It is therefore important to apply a disinfection protocol during foot-trimming; the authors have identified three common disinfectants that may be suitable.

    Categories: Journal news

    Selected highlights from other journals

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020
    Incidence patterns of orofacial clefts in purebred dogs

    N. Roman, P. C. Carney, N. Fiani and others

    PLoS ONE (2019) 14

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0224574

    • What did the research find?

    Of the 7429 puppies included in this study, 228 were reported to have orofacial clefts. Cleft palate was seen significantly more frequently than cleft lip or a combination of cleft palate and cleft lip and was more likely to occur in male dogs. Brachycephalic breeds and those in the mastiff/terrier breed group were found to be more predisposed to orofacial clefts than the general population. Compared with the USA as a whole, dogs originating from the Midwest region were less likely to have orofacial clefts.

    • How was it conducted?

    An online survey was distributed to all dog breeders registered with the American Kennel Club. Information collected included breed, breeder demographics, number of purebred litters whelped in the preceding 12...

    Categories: Journal news

    GPs deserve credit for public trust of vets

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    I read, with great comfort, the results of the latest RCVS survey1 of the public, which reported that vets are among the most trusted UK professionals.

    Credit for the levels of trust shown by the public should be given first and in greatest part to the general practitioners

    This echoes the previous report from 2015 (VR, 30 May 2015, vol 176, p 563). Credit for the levels of trust shown by the public should be given first and in greatest part to those who engage with the public most often – the general practitioners.

    The survey results do not reflect the work of the exceptional, or of those who occasionally interact with the public; they reflect the everyday common experience for the public. This experience has been built and sustained at astonishing levels over decades, not by accident, but by the diligent work of competent, conscientious,...

    Categories: Journal news

    QX-like infectious bronchitis virus reported in India

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Infectious bronchitis is one of the most economically significant diseases to have an impact on poultry production, health and welfare worldwide.1 Previous work in India has reported the presence of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strains Massachusetts (Mass) and 793B.2, 3 Since the first report of the IBV QX variant in China in 1996,4 QX-like strains have been detected around the globe,5, 6 and we are now reporting QX-like IBV in India.

    Between April and June 2019, a pool of oropharyngeal samples was collected separately from 11 smallholder chicken flocks (45–60 days old) in Tamil Nadu, India. Birds presented with signs of dullness, depression, oculonasal discharge, respiratory distress, sneezing, head shaking, prostration and increased mortality (up to 6.3%). Postmortem examination revealed the presence of catarrhal exudates in the sinuses and trachea, moderately congested and oedematous lungs and...

    Categories: Journal news

    Do you know about neck threadworm in horses?

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    I am appealing to practising equine vets to contribute to research for my BSc dissertation. I am assessing the awareness of vets working in equine veterinary practice of Onchocerca cervicalis (neck threadworm).

    Because clinical signs can be controlled using routine worming measures, the parasite has not been studied in depth in the UK since the 1970s. However, as the industry moves away from routine worming to reduce the risk of anthelmintic resistance, clinical cases of O cervicalis, which are currently rare in the UK, may begin to re-emerge.

    Therefore, I would like to encourage practising equine vets to complete a short online questionnaire. This includes specific questions about the parasite, as well as questions on cases of unresponsive skin conditions that can produce similar clinical signs to O cervicalis. All responses will be anonymous.

    The survey can be accessed at https://harper-adams.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/assessing-the-awareness-of-onchocerca-cervicalis-amongst-e-2, and I thank participants in advance...

    Categories: Journal news

    Be on the look out for exotic diseases

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    There is currently a focus on exotic diseases arriving in the UK due to the increased movement of pets through the Pet Travel Scheme and the activity of charitable organisations bringing many stray and street dogs here from other countries. This has centred on vectorborne and parasitic diseases. I would like to raise practitioners’ awareness of another exotic disease in the hope of helping them to avoid repeating my oversight.

    I recently treated a female labrador that had been rescued from a breeding farm in China and imported to the UK by a rescue society. The importation had been completed entirely legally and correctly, but there were no clinical notes or history to accompany this dog beyond the pet passport.

    At examination there were no significant abnormal findings, beyond looking unkempt, in the way that a kennelled, breeding dog would be, and being in season. Spaying was therefore postponed...

    Categories: Journal news

    Death notices

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Horrox On 1 January 2020, Michael Alan Horrox, MRCVS, of Bridlington, East Yorkshire. Mr Horrox qualified from Edinburgh in 1947.

    doi: 10.1136/vr.m138

    Categories: Journal news

    Climate change: 'no get out of jail free card

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Pete Smith and Andrew Balmford argue that methane from livestock is an important contributor to climate change and that it should not be creatively discounted.

    Categories: Journal news

    Making a sustainable change

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Two years ago, Ellie West made a decision to focus part of her career on a topic that had become particularly important to her – the environment. She tells Claire Read about that journey, and what other veterinary professionals can do to increase sustainability in their work as the new year gets underway.

    Categories: Journal news

    Take it outside

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Ellie West’s top tip for work-life balance – get out and enjoy nature – is not only about maintaining mental wellbeing. She says it’s also about developing a sense of why sustainability is so important.

    ‘Engaging with nature sounds like a trite thing to do, but we know about the mental health benefits of active travel [making journeys by being physically active], of understanding nature, of bringing nature into your workplace in different ways,’ says Ellie, clinical veterinary anaesthetist and sustainability lead at Davies Veterinary Specialists.

    ‘Personally for me, the more I get out and about, the more I can bring nature into my routine, the more I appreciate it.

    ‘It’s like David Attenborough has said: "No one will protect what they don’t care about and no one will care about what they have never experienced." You can’t want to protect what you don’t love, you can’t love it...

    Categories: Journal news

    The value of New Years resolutions

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Want to set a resolution for 2020 that you can actually keep? Then think less about goals and more about values, advises Jen Gale.

    Categories: Journal news

    A tasty toast for the New Year

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    Kick the new year off right with our tasty spin on a breakfast and brunch classic. Serves two.

    Categories: Journal news

    Roger Ewbank

    Veterinary Record latest issue - 17 January 2020

    A vet whose wide interests in animal behaviour and welfare led to their inclusion in vets’ professional training. He contributed much to animal welfare legislation and also published widely on these topics.

    Categories: Journal news

    When circumstances change, voluntary work can be a great way to meet people

    Patricia Colville is the business development director with Vets Now. Throughout her career, voluntary work has given her additional skills that have led to some exciting opportunities.

    Categories: Journal news
    Syndicate content