Feed aggregator

Do dolphins get Alzheimers disease?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia in people on a global scale, is still in search of reliable animal models that mirror its key neuropathological features, that is, amyloid β deposition and neurofibrillary tau protein tangles, in diseased human brains.1

The simultaneous occurrence of amyloid β and tau aggregates has been described in the brain of bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) and striped (Stenella coeruleoalba) dolphins found beached along the coast of Spain.2 Amyloid β plaque-associated brain pathology has been recently documented in bottlenose dolphins stranded along the Atlantic USA coastline, with their cerebral parenchyma also found to have high concentrations of β-methylamino-L-alanine, a cyanobacterial neurotoxin.3

Are dolphins prone to develop Alzheimer’s disease?

Do these findings suggest that dolphins could be a ‘candidate’ model for the comparative neuropathological and neuropathogenetic study of Alzheimer’s disease in people? But this question should be preceded...

Categories: Journal news

Vets role in human rabies elimination

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

We were very pleased to see Jack Reece’s letter regarding the elimination of rabies (VR, 26 October 2019, vol 185, p 513).

Next year marks 10 years to the goal ‘Zero by 30’ – the global strategic plan to end human deaths from dog-mediated rabies by 2030. This target was set in 2015 by the World Health Organization, the World Organisation for Animal Health, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Global Alliance for Rabies Control.

Rabies still kills an estimated 59,000 people per year, of which half are children under the age of 15. Since more than 99 per cent of human rabies cases are a result of dog bites, those in the veterinary profession have a role in reducing human cases by promoting better education and mass dog vaccination.

The Webinar Vet has teamed up with MSD Animal Health for its 2020 virtual...

Categories: Journal news

Corrections: Death notices

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Letters & Notices: Death notices (VR, 7 December 2019, vol 185, p 698). The date of death for Glyn Jenkins was given incorrectly. The correct date was 19 November 2019. The error is regretted.

doi: 10.1136/vr.l6999

Categories: Journal news

Discuss risks and benefits with clients

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

I agree with Martin Whitehead – at least in part – on one point concerning raw feeding (VR, 23 November 2019, vol 185, p 635). My experience concurs with his, that pet owners do not always have a high regard for veterinary nutritional advice. But perhaps we should ask why? Might it be that they now appreciate that the ultra-processed foods recommended by many in our profession might have significant adverse influences on their pets’ health as they do for us humans?1

Whitehead labels those who drive raw feeding as being anti-science, and compares them with ‘anti-vaccinationists’. I might ask why the latter take their stance against vaccination?

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association recommend2 that vaccine administration should be subject to a risk assessment and yet I cannot recall any adult cat coming to us with a history that includes records of any assessment...

Categories: Journal news

Death notices

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Ewbank On 16 November 2019, Roger Ewbank, OBE, BVSc, MVSc, CBiol, FIBiol, HonDSc, MRCVS, of Ashbourne, Derbyshire. Mr Ewbank qualified from Liverpool in 1957.

doi: 10.1136/vr.l6996

Gooderham On 9 December 2019, Keith Richard Gooderham, BVSc, DPMP, MRCVS, of Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire. Mr Gooderham qualified from Liverpool in 1962.

doi: 10.1136/vr.l6997

West On 4 December 2019, William Reginald George West, BVMS, MRCVS, of Taunton, Somerset. Mr West qualified from Glasgow in 1950.

doi: 10.1136/vr.l6998

Categories: Journal news

Why I have decided to leave my job

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

A couple of months ago I decided to leave my job.

There was no big scandal – perhaps if there had been, this column would have been easier to write. The truth is, I just felt stale.

I knew it wasn’t anything to do with the veterinary practice where I was working. As far as first-opinion practices go, I’m not sure I’ll ever find a better one than Bicester Vets. As well as being wonderfully supportive, they gave me every opportunity to develop professionally, including offering to put me through certificate study, but I knew this wasn’t going to solve the problem. Yes I needed a change, but I knew I didn’t need more veterinary medicine in my life to get me out of this rut, I needed less.

This realisation was harder to cope with than I thought it would be. I’ve always known I’ve had other interests....

Categories: Journal news

How is your client feeling? The power of mediation

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

This month, Jennie Jones from the Veterinary Client Mediation Service discusses how mediation can help to resolve client complaints

Categories: Journal news

Key information about small animal skin diseases for practitioners

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Reviewed by Rosario Cerundolo, head of the dermatology service at Dick White Referrals.

Categories: Journal news

Welfare at slaughter, good workplace and bTB policy positions: a progress report

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

BVA is developing new policy position papers in three key areas. BVA Council members were invited to contribute feedback on drafts of each paper.

Categories: Journal news

Policy position on obesity approved

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Introducing a new BVA policy position on obesity in dogs, cats, horses, donkeys and rabbits, BVA President Daniella Dos Santos (pictured) explained that obesity had been identified as a priority animal welfare problem in BVA’s Animal Welfare Strategy.

BVA and the British Veterinary Nursing Association (BVNA) had collaborated on the new policy position, which covered issues such as body condition scoring, promoting healthy body images, the role of vet professionals, vet practices and owners in supporting early intervention, and weight management programmes and dietary choices. She noted that there had also been discussion of whether to recognise obesity as a disease.

However, Jo Oakden of BVNA explained that BVNA strongly opposed classifying obesity as a disease. There were concerns that doing so would create barriers – for example, by requiring a diagnosis to be made by a vet before a vet nurse could get involved in managing a case....

Categories: Journal news

Pain management during castration and tail docking of sheep

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Council was asked to approve a new BVA policy position on sheep castration, tail docking and pain management

Categories: Journal news

'Under care and 24/7 cover review

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

BVA will be contributing to the RCVS’s review of ‘under care’ and 24/7 cover and is convening a working group to help it develop its position.

Categories: Journal news

Council news in brief

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019
Avian influenza

A case of low pathogenic H5 avian influenza had been confirmed on a farm in Suffolk on 10 December, the day before the Council meeting. BVA President Daniella Dos Santos reported that investigations into the source of the outbreak were underway. She also noted that the case had been identified by a private veterinary surgeon who had been investigating a drop in egg production on the premises, demonstrating the vital importance of disease surveillance.

African swine fever

A member of BVA’s South East region had written to compliment the Association on the work it had been doing to raise awareness of African swine fever, and to encourage continued action to remind vets and the public of the threat posed by this disease.

New board director

Council elected Chris May to the BVA Board to serve a three-year term. Emma Callaghan, a member of the Appointments...

Categories: Journal news

Team work makes the dream work

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Melissa Beck and Lucy Gunn are joint venture partners at Vets4Pets Nuneaton, the practice that this year won the New Practice of the Year award at the company’s National Partner Conference.

Categories: Journal news

In memory

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

The daughter of a grateful client is running a marathon in memory of her vet who died in March. Alison Drake is running the Hong Kong half marathon on 9 February 2020. Her JustGiving page explains that she is running for MIND in memory of Salisbury-based vet Mark Richer – ‘a remarkable and gifted veterinary surgeon who came into our lives and then was taken away very suddenly. He was the kindest human being you could ever meet...His vet skills were exceptional and we all miss this young, vibrant, sweet, kind, beautiful, exceptional, gentle, softly spoken human being and vet.’ Mark, who qualified from the Royal Veterinary College in 1993, was a small animal practitioner as well as a barrister. Donations in his memory may be made at www.justgiving.com/fundraising/cherry-drake

Categories: Journal news

People

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Vet nurse Sarah James has been appointed veterinary relationship and technical claims manager for pet insurance business Bought By Many. With six years’ experience, she was previously a head vet nurse with Independent Vetcare. She will be responsible for working with UK vet practices to ensure claims are straightforward and clear for both pet owners and vets. Her role will also involve evaluating technical claims using her extensive knowledge of the industry and treatments. The company was voted the UK’s most trusted pet insurance provider in the Moneywise Customer Service Awards earlier this year and says it has made continuous improvements to its policies to make insurance better for everyone.

Philippa Weston from Willows Veterinary Centre and Referral Service, in Solihull, won an award for the best abstract related to neuroimaging at the annual conference of the European College of Veterinary Neurology, which was held in Wroclaw, Poland, recently....

Categories: Journal news

Applications open for funding welfare studies

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

The Humane Slaughter Association (HSA) is inviting applications for its student/trainee scholarships. The scholarships were established in 1986 as a memorial to the late Dorothy Sidley, general secretary to the HSA for 48 years, to provide funding to enable students or trainees in the industry to carry out a project that is aimed at improving the welfare of production animals during marketing, transport and slaughter. The project may be carried out as an integral part of a student’s coursework over an academic year or during the summer vacation.

The deadline for applications is midnight on 28 February 2020. To apply, or find further information on these and other grants that the HSA offers, see www.hsa.org.uk/grants

Categories: Journal news

Is 24-hour cover sustainable?

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

Described as ‘one of the most fundamental reviews of RCVS guidance in recent years’ the college’s review of ‘under care’ and, within it, the provision of 24-hour emergency cover, is likely to have far-reaching implications. The review process is set to last until at least November next year, and the RCVS will be gathering evidence and seeking views from the profession and more widely.

The requirement for vets to make provision for 24-hour emergency cover has been scrutinised every four or five years or so over the past 15 years. Significantly, in 2005, following a review, the RCVS council agreed that vets in practice no longer needed to ‘make adequate arrangements for the provision of 24-hour cover’ but should instead ‘take steps to provide 24-hour emergency cover’. Vets were obliged to ‘not unreasonably’ refuse to provide first aid and pain relief for any animal of a species treated by...

Categories: Journal news

Obesity not recognised as a disease by BVA

Veterinary Record latest issue - 19 December 2019

By Josh Loeb

Obesity is not a disease, BVA council has decided.

The position runs contrary to a decision by the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA) to classify obesity as a disease.

The American Medical Association also classifies it as a disease but the NHS does not.

Vets and vet nurses with differing views on whether obesity should be formally classified as a disease in dogs, cats, horses, donkeys and rabbits aired their views at a BVA council meeting last week.

The debate was followed by a vote, and the majority of council members supported BVA’s policy position stating that, while obesity ‘can result from disease and often causes secondary disease processes’, formally classifying it as a disease could have unintended negative consequences.

The BVA will therefore retain its position of not recognising obesity as a disease. However, the association does ‘strongly support’ the position that obesity should...

Categories: Journal news
Syndicate content