United Kingdom

The P-glycoprotein inhibitor ketoconazole causes a reversion to sensitivity in ivermectin resistant cyathostomins in vitro

Citation

Laura Peachey, Jacqui. B. Matthews, Gina L. Pinchbeck, Faith A. Burden, Jane Hodgkinson. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor ketoconazole causes a reversion to sensitivity in ivermectin resistant cyathostomins in vitro. Presented at Anthelmintics: From Discovery to Resistance. (5 February - 7 February 2014). San Francisco, USA.

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Date presented: 
Thursday 6 February 2014
Abstract

Anthelmintic resistance is a growing problem in both the developed and developing world; of most concern is the level of resistance detected against the potent macrocylic lactone (ML) anthelmintics. To identify and target a common mechanism of resistance to anthelmintics would allow potential modification of existing drugs, and may even enable the prediction and prevention of the development of resistance to novel drugs. There is a growing body of evidence that P-glycoproteins (P-gps) are involved in resistance to the MLs in many parasitic nematodes of humans and veterinary species (Ardelli et al, 2011). P-gps belong to class two of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein superfamily; they are responsible for the active removal of xenobiotic compounds from cells. The cyathostomins are gastrointestinal nematodes of equids that cause significant pathology. Recently resistance to MLs has been described in cyathostomins (Molento et al, 2008), its mechanisms have not yet been elucidated.

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The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys

Citation

Christopher J Corbett, Sandy Love, Anna Moore, Faith A. Burden, Jacqui. B. Matthews, Matthew Denwood. January 2014. The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys. Parasites and Vectors. 7:48.

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Publication date: 
24 January 2014
Volume: 
7
Issue: 
48
DOI number: 
doi:10.1186/1756-3305-7-48
Abstract

Background: The level of anthelmintic resistance within some cyathostomin parasite populations has increased to the level where sole reliance on anthelmintic-based control protocols is not possible. Management-based nematode control methods, including removal of faeces from pasture, are widely recommended for use in association with a reduction in anthelmintic use to reduce selection pressure for drug resistance; however, very little work has been performed to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of such methods.

Methods: We analysed data obtained from 345 donkeys at The Donkey Sanctuary (Devon, UK), managed under three different pasture management techniques, to investigate the effectiveness of faeces removal in strongyle control in equids. The management groups were as follows: no removal of faeces from pasture, manual, twice weekly removal of faeces from pasture and automatic, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture (using a mechanical pasture sweeper). From turn-out onto pasture in May, monthly faecal egg counts were obtained for each donkey and the dataset subjected to an auto regressive moving average model.

Results: There was little to no difference in faecal egg counts between the two methods of faecal removal; both resulted in significantly improved cyathostomin control compared to the results obtained from the donkeys that grazed pasture from which there was no faecal removal.

Conclusions: This study represents a valuable and unique assessment of the effectiveness of the removal of equine faeces from pasture, and provides an evidence base from which to advocate twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture as an adjunct for equid nematode control. Widespread adoption of this practice could substantially reduce anthelmintic usage, and hence reduce selection pressure for nematode resistance to the currently effective anthelmintic products.

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Expression of PGP 9.5 by Enteric Neurons in Horses and Donkeys with and without Intestinal Disease

Citation

Neil Hudson, G.T. Pearson, I.G. Mayhew, Christopher Proudman, Faith A. Burden, Constance Fintl. November 2013. Expression of PGP 9.5 by Enteric Neurons in Horses and Donkeys with and without Intestinal Disease. Journal of Comparative Pathology.

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Publication date: 
26 November 2013
DOI number: 
doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2013.11.203
Abstract

Intestinal motility disorders are an important problem in horses and donkeys and this study was carried out in order to evaluate the enteric neurons in animals with and without intestinal disease. Surplus intestinal tissue samples were collected from 28 horses undergoing exploratory laparotomy for colic. In addition, surplus intestinal samples from 17 control horses were collected immediately following humane destruction for clinical conditions not relating to the intestinal tract. Similar samples were also collected during routine post-mortem examinations from 12 aged donkeys; six animals were humanely destroyed for conditions related to the intestinal tract, while the remaining six were humanely destroyed for other reasons including dental and orthopaedic diseases. Tissue samples were fixed in formalin and immunohistochemical labelling was performed targeting the enteric neurons using a polyclonal antibody specific for the neuronal marker PGP 9.5. The distribution and density of neuronal networks were assessed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. There was strong PGP 9.5 expression in both the horse and donkey samples and labelling was detected throughout the tissue sections. In both species, PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibres were detected in all layers of the intestinal tract, both in large and small intestinal samples. Networks of enteric neurons were present in the donkey with a similar distribution to that seen in the horse. There was no demonstrable difference in enteric neuronal density and distribution in the groups of animals with intestinal disease compared with those without, apart from two (out of 28) horses with intestinal disease that showed a marked reduction in PGP 9.5 immunoreactivity. Apart from these two animals, this total cohort analysis differs from some previously observed findings in horses with intestinal disease and may therefore reflect the different pathophysiological processes occurring in varying intestinal conditions resulting in colic both in the donkey and the horse.

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Donkey assisted therapy

Citation

David Cook, Stephen Blakeway. Donkey assisted therapy. Presented at Donkey Welfare Symposium 2013. (1 November 2013). California, USA.

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Date presented: 
Friday 1 November 2013

Handling untrained and poorly trained donkeys

Citation

Ben Hart. Handling untrained and poorly trained donkeys. Presented at Donkey Welfare Symposium. (1 November 2013). California, USA.

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Date presented: 
Friday 1 November 2013

Nutrition and dental care of donkeys

Citation

Faith A. Burden, Nicole du Toit, Alexandra K. Thiemann. August 2013. Nutrition and dental care of donkeys. In Practice. 35. 405-410.

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Publication date: 
1 August 2013
Journal: 
In Practice
Volume: 
35
Page numbers: 
405-410
DOI number: 
doi:10.1136/inp.f4367
Abstract

The domestic donkey is descended from wild asses and has evolved to live in some of the most inhospitable places on earth. Little research has been carried out to address the specific needs of the donkey, which has traditionally been viewed as a small horse. The donkey is different from the horse in many ways; of particular note is its ability to thrive on highly fibrous feeds. This article discusses the nutritional requirements of donkeys and how dental disease may play a role in determining their nutritional requirements.

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Statistical assessment of risk for the clinical management of equine sarcoids in a population of Equus asinus

Citation

Stuart W. Reid, George Gettingby. March 1996. Statistical assessment of risk for the clinical management of equine sarcoids in a population of Equus asinus. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. 26:2. 87-95.

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Publication date: 
1 March 1996
Volume: 
26
Issue: 
2
Page numbers: 
87-95
DOI number: 
10.1016/0167-5877(95)00521-8
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Reference values for physiological, haematological and biochemical parameters in domestic donkeys (Equus asinus)

Citation

Jane French, Valerie Patrick. February 1995. Reference values for physiological, haematological and biochemical parameters in domestic donkeys (Equus asinus). Equine Veterinary Education. 7. 33-35.

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Publication details
Publication date: 
1 February 1995
Volume: 
7
Page numbers: 
33-35
DOI number: 
10.1111/j.2042-3292.1995.tb01179.x
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Use of sterile maggots to treat panniculitis in an aged donkey

Citation

Nick J. Bell, S. Thomas. December 2001. Use of sterile maggots to treat panniculitis in an aged donkey. The Veterinary Record. 149. 768-770.

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Publication details
Publication date: 
1 December 2001
Volume: 
149
Page numbers: 
768-770
DOI number: 
10.1136/vr.149.25.768
Abstract

An aged female donkey developed a severe, localised, suppurative panniculitis secondary to a skin wound. Bacterial culture of swabs taken from the wound gave a profuse growth of multi-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a profuse growth of Escherichia coli and a moderate growth of beta-haemolytic Streptococcus species. The lesion did not respond to conventional medical and surgical treatment and continued to progress. Six applications of sterile larvae (maggots) of the common greenbottle, Lucilia sericata, were used to debride the wound successfully.

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