dental anatomy

Normal donkey dental anatomy

Citation

Nicole du Toit, Susan A. Kempson, Padraic M. Dixon. October 2006. Normal donkey dental anatomy. Presented at 5th International Colloquium on Working Equines. (30 October - 2 November 2006). Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 30 October 2006
Abstract

This study examined normal donkey teeth using gross anatomical inspection, computed axial tomography (CAT), radiography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and, decalcified and undecalcified histology to determine their normal gross anatomy, histology and ultrastructure. CAT findings have shown donkey endodontic anatomy and the density (in Hounslow units) of donkey calcified dental tissues, i.e. enamel, dentine and cementum to be similar to values recorded in horses. Decalcified and undecalcified histology has identified donkey cheek teeth to have a similar histological appearance to that which has been described in the horse. SEM of donkey dental tissue has demonstrated minor differences to normal horse dental ultrastructure. Now that normal donkey dental anatomy has been clearly defined, pathological changes can be identified in diseased teeth and supporting structures and will allow a better understanding of the pathophysiology of common donkey dental disorders. Ultimately the results of this project will enable better dental care specifically developed for donkeys, promoting welfare in the donkey.

Proceedings
Publisher: 
The Donkey Sanctuary
Publication date: 
30 October 2006

Donkey dental anatomy. Part 2: Histological and scanning electron microscopic examinations

Citation

Nicole du Toit, Susan A. Kempson, Padraic M. Dixon. June 2008. Donkey dental anatomy. Part 2: Histological and scanning electron microscopic examinations. The Veterinary Journal. 176:3. 345-353.

Authors
Publication details
Publication date: 
1 June 2008
Volume: 
176
Issue: 
3
Page numbers: 
345-353
DOI number: 
10.1016/j.tvjl.2008.03.004
Abstract

Ten normal cheek teeth (CT) were extracted at post mortem from donkeys that died or were euthanased for humane reasons. Decalcified histology was performed on three sections (sub-occlusal, mid-tooth and pre-apical) of each tooth, and undecalcified histology undertaken on sub-occlusal sections of the same teeth. The normal histological anatomy of primary, regular and irregular secondary dentine was found to be similar to that of the horse, with no tertiary dentine present. Undecalcified histology demonstrated the normal enamel histology, including the presence of enamel spindles. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on mid-tooth sections of five maxillary CT, five mandibular CT and two incisors. The ultrastructural anatomy of primary and secondary dentine, and equine enamel types-1, -2 and -3 (as described in horses) were identified in donkey teeth. Histological and ultrastructural donkey dental anatomy was found to be very similar to equine dental anatomy with only a few quantitative differences observed.

Donkey dental anatomy. Part 1: Gross and computed axial tomography examinations

Citation

Nicole du Toit, Susan A. Kempson, Padraic M. Dixon. June 2008. Donkey dental anatomy. Part 1: Gross and computed axial tomography examinations. The Veterinary Journal. 176:3. 338-344.

Authors
Publication details
Publication date: 
1 June 2008
Volume: 
176
Issue: 
3
Page numbers: 
338-344
DOI number: 
10.1016/j.tvjl.2008.03.003
Abstract

Post-mortem examination of 19 donkey skulls showed that donkeys have a greater degree of anisognathia (27% width difference between upper and lower jaws) compared to horses (23%). Teeth (n = 108) were collected from 14 skulls and examined grossly and by computed axial tomography (CAT). A greater degree of peripheral enamel infolding was found in mandibular cheek teeth (CT) compared to maxillary CT (P < 0.001). A significant increase in peripheral cementum from the apical region to the clinical crown was demonstrated in all CT (P < 0.0001). All donkey CT had at least five pulp cavities with six pulp cavities present in the 06s and 11s. A new endodontic numbering system for equid CT has been proposed. A greater occlusal depth of secondary dentine (mm) was present in older donkeys (>16 years) than in the younger (<15 years) donkeys studied. Based on gross and CAT examinations, donkey dental anatomy was shown to be largely similar to that described in horses.

Syndicate content