working equine

Empathy education about working animals in primary schools of central Ethiopia

Citation

G. Lemessa, Alemayehu Fanta, E. Bojia, B. Amare, Mersha Tesfaye, S. J. Price, Stephen Blakeway. December 2010. Empathy education about working animals in primary schools of central Ethiopia. Presented at 6th International Colloquium on Working Equids. (29 November - 2 December 2010). New Delhi, India.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 29 November 2010
Abstract

The Donkey Sanctuary in Ethiopia launched an empathy education programme at 7 primary schools in 2005, to nurture school children's empathy with working animals. The objective of the programme was to enhance the ability of schoolchildren to build smooth relationships and positive attitudes towards animals, resulting in the creation of responsible citizens who are compassionate, kind, and love and have empathy with all animals. To show empathy is to identify with another's feelings. It is to put yourself emotionally in the place of another.

Proceedings
Publication date: 
31 December 2010

Community-based harness development initiative for pack donkeys: a progress report, Ethiopia

Citation

Mersha Tesfaye, E. Bojia, Feseha Gebreab, G. Ayele, Alemayehu Fanta, G. Lemessa, E. Manyahilishal, F. Seyoum, B. Amare, N. Dereje, C. Chala, A. Abebe, A. Gete, Chris Garrett, Joe Anzuino, Rob Nicholls, Mulugeta Getachew. December 2010. Community-based harness development initiative for pack donkeys: a progress report, Ethiopia. Presented at 6th International Colloquium on Working Equids. (29 November - 2 December 2010). New Delhi, India.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 29 November 2010
Proceedings
Publication date: 
31 December 2010

When is dental treatment required in working equids? A survey of Mexican donkeys

Citation

Nicole du Toit, Faith A. Burden, Andrew F. Trawford. December 2010. When is dental treatment required in working equids? A survey of Mexican donkeys. Presented at 6th International Colloquium on Working Equids. (29 November - 2 December 2010). New Delhi, India.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 29 November 2010
Abstract

A small survey of working donkeys in Mexico illustrated a high prevalence of dental disease (62%). However, only 18% of cases were severe enough to have an apparent impact on the a donkey's welfare and required dental treatment. Many donkeys manage well with some degree of dental disease and owner education about agerelated dental disease and the need for supplemental feeding will alleviate some of the welfare implications of dental disease, particularly where resources for dental treatment are limited.

Proceedings
Publisher: 
The Brooke
Publication date: 
31 December 2010

Semi-longitudinal study of trypanosomiasis and its vectors in donkeys (equus africanus asinus, fitzinger) in the Lamu archipelago

Citation

Phoebe Mukiria, Raymond Mdachi, J. Thuita, James Mutuku, Kennedy Wanjala, J. Omolo, Mulugeta Getachew, Andrew F. Trawford, Johnson Ouma, Grace Murilla. Semi-longitudinal study of trypanosomiasis and its vectors in donkeys (equus africanus asinus, fitzinger) in the Lamu archipelago. Presented at 12th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference. (8 November - 12 November 2010). Loresho, Nairobi, Kenya.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 8 November 2010
Abstract

Kenya is home to some 600,000 donkeys that are found virtually in all ecological zones where they provide transport and draught power. In the Lamu archipelago where there is no motorised transport, donkeys are virtually the only available means of transport helping to transport farm produce, building materials and for getting from one place to the next. This study was conducted in April (dry season) and November 2009 (wet season) in four villages in Pate Island to investigate the prevalence and species of trypanosomes infecting donkeys and to identify the fly vectors playing a role in the transmission of trypanosomosis. Blood samples were collected from 288 and 319 donkeys and examined by buffy coat technique (BCT) and Giemsa stained blood smears. Trypanosomes were encountered in 3.1 and 7.5% of the examined donkeys in the dry and wet season respectively and there was no difference in the prevalence between villages during both seasons (p=0.159 and 0.709) but there was a significant difference (p=0.006) between seasons. Three species of trypanosomes detected were, in order of predominance were Trypanosoma congolense Broden (68.7%), Trypanosoma vivax Ziemann (21.8%) and Trypanosoma brucei Plimmer and Bradford (6.2%). Another 6.2% were mixed infections. There difference in mean PCVs between trypanosome infected and non-infected donkeys dry and wet seasons ranging significant to highly significant (p<0.05 and p<0.001) respectively. Trypanosome infection had a significant effect on mean body condition score of the donkeys during both seasons (p<0.05 and p<0.001). Prevalence of trypanosome infection was found to be independent of sex and age. However, mean PCV was significantly associated with age, sex and body condition scores. The entomological surveys revealed the presence of Glossina pallidipes Austen and other biting flies namely Stomoxys spp Linnaeus, Tabanus spp. Linnaeus, and Haematopota spp Linnaeus. Though the use of BCT for detection of trypanosomes in the field is
almost universal, it has limited application especially in chronic infections and the field samples are in the process of being analysed using PCR to give a more accurate picture of the prevalence and as it relates to health and productivity of donkeys.

Gastrointestinal parasites of working donkeys in Ethiopia

Citation

Mulugeta Getachew, Feseha Gebreab, Andrew F. Trawford, Stuart W. Reid. January 2010. Gastrointestinal parasites of working donkeys in Ethiopia. Tropical Animal Health and Production. 4:1. 1-13.

Authors
Publication details
Publication date: 
1 January 2010
Volume: 
4
Issue: 
1
Page numbers: 
1-13
DOI number: 
10.1007/s11250-009-9381-0
Abstract

The general prevalence and population composition of gastrointestinal and pulmonary helminths of working donkeys were studied. For the purpose 2935 working donkeys were coprologically examined for nematode and cestode, and 215 donkeys for trematode infections. Seven donkeys that died due to various health problems or were euthanased on a welfare ground were necropsied and the parasites were recovered and identified to the species level. The study was conducted during the periods 1996-1999.

Coprological examination revealed 99% strongyle, 80% Fasciola, 51% Parascaris, 30% Gastrodiscus, 11% Strongyloides westeri, 8% cestodes and 2% Oxyuris equi infection prevalence. Over 55% of donkeys had more than 1000 eggs per gram of faeces (epg). Forty two different species of parasites consisting of 33 nematodes, 3 trematodes, 3 cestodes and 3 arthropod larvae were identified from postmortem examined donkeys. Among the nematodes 17 species of Cyathostominae and 7 species of Strongylinae were identified. Other parasites identified include, Habronema muscae, Draschia megastoma, Trichostrongylus axei, Strongyloides westeri, Anoplocephala perfoliata, Anoplocephala magna, Anoplocephaloides (Paranoplocephala) mamillana, Parascaris equorum, Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica, Gastrodiscus aegyptiacus, Dictyocaulus arnfieldi, Oxyuris equi, Probstmayria vivipara, Gasterophilus intestinalis, Gasterophilus nasalis, Rhinoestrus uzbekistanicus and Setaria equina. This study revealed that working donkeys in Ethiopia are infected with a range of helminths and arthropod larvae, which are representatives of the important pathogenic parasites found in equids worldwide.

Online references

Hyena bite: A potential threat to the lives of working donkeys in central Ethiopia

Citation

Mersha Tesfaye, Feseha Gebreab, E. Bojia, Alemayehu Fanta, G. Ayele, B. Amare, N. Dereje, C. Chala, A. Abebe, Joe Anzuino, Andrew F. Trawford, Mulugeta Getachew. October 2006. Hyena bite: A potential threat to the lives of working donkeys in central Ethiopia. Presented at 5th International Colloquium on Working Equines. (30 October - 2 November 2006). Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 5.244-249.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Sunday 29 October 2006
Proceedings
Volume: 
5
Number of pages: 
244-249
Publisher: 
The Donkey Sanctuary
Publication date: 
29 October 2006

The strongyle nematodes of working donkeys from Ethiopia

Citation

Tetyana K. Kuzmina, Victor A. Kharchencko, Mulugeta Getachew. The strongyle nematodes of working donkeys from Ethiopia. Presented at 21st International Conference of the Worldwide Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology. (19 August - 23 August 2007). Ghent, Belgium. 21.380.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Monday 20 August 2007
Proceedings
Volume: 
21
Number of pages: 
380

Control of equine cyathostomins under the mid-lowland tropical weather condition of Ethiopia: a mathematical modelling approach

Citation

Mulugeta Getachew, Andrew F. Trawford, Feseha Gebreab, Stuart W. Reid, Sandy Love, Giles T. Innocent. October 2006. Control of equine cyathostomins under the mid-lowland tropical weather condition of Ethiopia: a mathematical modelling approach. Presented at 5th International Colloquium on Working Equines. (30 October - 2 November 2006). Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 5.96-109.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Sunday 29 October 2006
Proceedings
Volume: 
5
Number of pages: 
96-109
Publisher: 
The Donkey Sanctuary
Publication date: 
29 October 2006

Toward the development of a modular e-learning syllabus for working equines

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Citation

Alexandra K. Thiemann. December 2010. Toward the development of a modular e-learning syllabus for working equines. Presented at 6th International Colloquium on Working Equids. (29 November - 2 December 2010). New Delhi, India. 6th.

Authors
Presentation details
Date presented: 
Wednesday 1 December 2010
Proceedings
Volume: 
6th
Publisher: 
The Brooke
Publication date: 
1 December 2010

Gasterophilosis: a major cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia

Citation

Mulugeta Getachew, Giles T. Innocent, Andrew F. Trawford, Stuart W. Reid, Sandy Love. August 2011. Gasterophilosis: a major cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia. Tropical Animal Health and Production.

Authors
Publication details
Publication date: 
27 August 2011
DOI number: 
10.1007/s11250-011-9961-7
Abstract

A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the cause of rectal prolapse in working donkeys in Ethiopia. Analysis of data on rectal prolapse cases obtained from the Donkey Health and Welfare Project clinic at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Addis Ababa University, from 1995 to 2004 revealed that 83.6% (n=177) of the cases were associated with Gasterophilus nasalis. The rest 10.7% and 5.7% were associated with work-related (overloading) cause and diarrhoea, respectively. The mean and median numbers of G. nasalis recovered from the rectum of infected donkeys were 66 and 64, respectively, with a range of 2–195. Over 100 G. nasalis larvae were recovered from the rectum of 22% of the donkeys. Circular demarcated ulcer-like and deep circumferential pits or ring-like mucosal lesions were found at the larval attachment sites. G. nasalis infection and the associated rectal prolapse were observed year round. However, the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse were significantly higher
during the rainy season (P<0.01). Age and sex of the donkeys had no significant effect on the intensity of rectal larval infection and incidence of rectal prolapse (P>0.05).

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